Thursday, November 16, 2017

Review: The Dark Horse

The Dark Horse The Dark Horse by Craig Johnson
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I've loved the Longmire books up to this one, but, so far, this is the weakest in the series. Longer than the others, unnecessarily, because the Sheriff spent a lot of time wandering in the desert on a horse! I'll still keep reading the series though--Walt is worth it.

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Review: The Tethered Mage

The Tethered Mage The Tethered Mage by Melissa Caruso
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

So close to be an awesome fantasy--just needed 50-100 pages edited out in the middle to keep it interesting. I'm afraid that other readers would give up in the middle. Lots of political intrigue that I enjoyed, and I loved the idea of Zaira being tied to her falcon, Lady Amalia. True fantasy fans, go ahead and read this--I think you'll enjoy the world building.

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Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Review: DK Eyewitness Travel Guide Ireland

DK Eyewitness Travel Guide Ireland DK Eyewitness Travel Guide Ireland by DK Publishing
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

DK really does hire the best graphic designers in the business. This is a beautiful travel guide--the photographs are perfect (Fodor should take note) and the illustrations are amazingly clear and precise. DK is a British company, so the text is written as if most travelers are coming from England.

I wish they included the current cost of tickets into the touristy places--other guidebooks do that and I appreciate it so that I can plan what I can afford to do.

I wouldn't use this guide for hotels--most of the ones listed are expensive. Rick Steves wins on that front.

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Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Review: The Woman in the Window

The Woman in the Window The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

A throwback to the old Hitchcock thrillers--this one made me say, "Oh, shit!" at one point at the end of the novel. Slow going at first--the main character is depressed, addicted to drugs and alcohol, and suffering from extreme agoraphobia. She won't leave her house, and it seems like she prefers not to shower either. She gets her kicks from helping people in an online forum (she was a child psychologist before she was sick) and using her camera to spy on all her neighbors. She is THAT woman in the window--watching everyone creepily and freaking the neighbors out.

If you've read a lot of suspense thrillers with unreliable narrators, you'll guess some of the twists and turns of the book, but hopefully there will be at least one twist that gets you. I'm glad Fox bought the movie rights--this will make a great one! It's a classic thriller movie retold for modern times.

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Sunday, November 12, 2017

Review: A June of Ordinary Murders

A June of Ordinary Murders A June of Ordinary Murders by Conor Brady
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Great mix historical fiction (1880s Dublin) and the newness of police detective work. Sgt. Swallow has a great relationship with Dr. Lafeyre, the medical examiner, so it was fun to read about how they were trying out "new" detective techniques together. Lots of Irish corruption, thanks to the British authorities and unrest in the country during this time period, and I loved reading about familiar streets, pubs, and landmarks in the city.

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Review: A June of Ordinary Murders

A June of Ordinary Murders A June of Ordinary Murders by Conor Brady
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Great mix historical fiction (1880s Dublin) and the newness of police detective work. Sgt. Swallow has a great relationship with Dr. Lafeyre, the medical examiner, so it was fun to read about how they were trying out "new" detective techniques together. Lots of Irish corruption, thanks to the British authorities and unrest in the country during this time period, and I loved reading about familiar streets, pubs, and landmarks in the city.

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